Program

Murray Hiatt - Classification Talk
ImageMurray was born into a farmer’s family in Payson, Utah but the farmer life was not to be. None of the childhood farm chores appealed to him; and Murray gave us some examples.

One job was planting celery stalks … rows and rows and rows of celery … and that went on for weeks and weeks and weeks.  The troughs between the rows served as irrigation ditches … so the job was wet, dirty and smelly.  To this day Murray can’t stand the smell of celery.

Sugar beets - Another favorite reason to not want to be a farmer. Murray did not get along with the Beet Hook … the tool of the sugar beet farmer.  It’s too short so one has to bend over to use it.  A real pain in the back.  No … not going to be a farmer.

 

After picking cherries, pitching hay, milking cows and scores of other back-breaking chores, the number of reasons to leave the farm became too many to ignore.  At age 17 Murray quit the farm - and school - and joined the Navy. Becoming a swabby on a destroyer tender was certainly better than farming.  But something was missing.  How come those officers got paid more, ate better food, had better quarters and generally had a nicer time in the Navy?  What did they have that he didn’t?  It was an “Aha!” moment for Murray. They had an education.

Murray got his GED while in the Navy and then went on to college.  He majored in accounting & finance and got a degree in political science.  Now armed with a degree Murray took a job as a mortgage lender with Seaboard Finance. That was the starting rung to the corporate ladder.

There were lots of promotions and many moves - Arizona, Montana, Washington State, Connecticut, California and New York. His responsibilities grew to the point where he was responsible for 65 offices in the Northeast.  Living and working in New York City was great. Broadway shows and all the wonderful things to do made New York the best of all the places he worked.  Moving back to California Murray started Imperial Savings.  He stayed there until moving to Gold Canyon in 2004.